Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By Wil – Cheshire Antiques Consultant
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining
Cheshire Antiques Consultant

Scottish Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle At Sunrise By William Haining

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  • 1 Fine Large Scottish Work of Art Oil Painting Medieval Ruin Dunnottar Castle Fortress By William Haining.
  • Subject famous place of Dunnottar Castle ruin in Scotland set at Sunrise, such an intriguing mysterious scene, as you can view the beautiful sunrise in the distance with marine seascape shoreline view of choppy seas washing onto  the small beach cove area, with the impressive old castle ruin perched high up on the cliff, with hills sloping down towards the cove further back with large stone boulders at the front, with a small walking path that goes along to the beach, having mainly grey overcast sky's overhead.
  • A fine example of his work.
  • Oil on board.
  • Circa late 20th century dated 1974.
  • Signed and dated in white by the Scottish artist William Haining 1889-1984.
  • Title verso “Sunrise Dunnottar Castle".
  • Provenance label verso.
  • Dunnottar Castle (Scottish Gaelic: Dùn Fhoithear, "fort on the shelving slope"] is a ruined medieval fortress located upon a rocky headland on the north-eastern coast of Scotland, about 2 miles (3 kilometres) south of Stonehaven. The surviving buildings are largely of the 15th and 16th centuries, but the site is believed to have been fortified in the Early Middle Ages. Dunnottar has played a prominent role in the history of Scotland through to the 18th-century Jacobite risings because of its strategic location and defensive strength.
  • Dunnottar is best known as the place where the Honours of Scotland, the Scottish crown jewels, were hidden from Oliver Cromwell's invading army in the 17th century. The property of the Keiths from the 14th century, and the seat of the Earl Marischal, Dunnottar declined after the last Earl forfeited his titles by taking part in the Jacobite rebellion of 1715. The castle was restored in the 20th century and is now open to the public.
  • The ruins of the castle are spread over 1.4 hectares (3+1⁄2 acres), surrounded by steep cliffs that drop to the North Sea, 160 feet (50 metres) below. A narrow strip of land joins the headland to the mainland, along which a steep path leads up to the gatehouse. The various buildings within the castle include the 14th-century tower house as well as the 16th-century palace. Dunnottar Castle is a scheduled monument, and twelve structures on the site were listed buildings.
  • A chapel at Dunnottar is said to have been founded by St Ninian in the 5th century, although it is not clear when the site was first fortified, but in any case the legend is late and highly implausible. Possibly the earliest written reference to the site is found in the Annals of Ulster which record two sieges of 'Dún Foither' in 681 and 694. The earlier event has been interpreted as an attack by Brude, the Pictish king of Fortriu, to extend his power over the north-east coast of Scotland.
  • During the reign of King William the Lion (ruled 1165–1214) Dunnottar was a centre of local administration for The Mearns. The castle is named in the Roman de Fergus, an early 13th-century Arthurian romance, in which the hero Fergus must travel to Dunnottar to retrieve a magic shield In May 1276 a church on the site was consecrated by William Wishart, Bishop of St Andrews.
  • The poet Blind Harry relates that William Wallace captured Dunnottar from the English in 1297, during the Wars of Scottish Independence. He is said to have imprisoned 4,000 defeated English soldiers in the church and burned them alive.
  • In 1336 Edward III of England ordered William Sinclair, 8th Baron of Roslin, to sail eight ships to the partially ruined Dunnottar for the purpose of rebuilding and fortifying the site as a forward resupply base for his northern campaign. Sinclair took with him 160 soldiers, horses, and a corps of masons and carpenters. Edward himself visited in July, but the English efforts were undone before the end of the year when the Scottish Regent Sir Andrew Murray led a force that captured and again destroyed the defences of Dunnottar.
  • In the 14th century, Dunnottar was granted to William de Moravia, 5th Earl of Sutherland (d.1370),and in 1346 a licence to crenellate was issued by David II. Around 1359 William Keith, Marischal of Scotland, married Margaret Fraser, niece of Robert the Bruce, and was granted the barony of Dunnottar at this time. Keith then gave the lands of Dunnottar to his daughter Christian and son-in-law William Lindsay of Byres, but in 1392 an excambion (exchange) was agreed whereby Keith regained Dunnottar and Lindsay took lands in Fife.
  • William Keith completed construction of the tower house at Dunnottar, but was excommunicated for building on the consecrated ground associated with the parish church. Keith had provided a new parish church closer to Stonehaven, but was forced to write to the Pope, Benedict XIII, who issued a bull in 1395 lifting the excommunication. William Keith's descendants were made Earls Marischal in the mid 15th century, and they held Dunottar until the 18th century.James IV came to Dunnotar on 15 October 1504.
  • A child played a musical instrument called a monochord for him, and he gave money to poor people. The king had brought his Italian minstrels and an African drummer, known as the "More taubronar". In 1581 George Keith succeeded as 5th Earl Marischal, and began a large-scale reconstruction that saw the medieval fortress converted into a more comfortable home. As the founder of Marischal College in Aberdeen, the 5th Earl valued Dunnottar as much for its dramatic situation as for its security.
  • In 1639 William Keith, 7th Earl Marischal, came out in support of the Covenanters, a Presbyterian movement who opposed the established Episcopal Church and the changes which Charles I was attempting to impose. With James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose, he marched against the Catholic James Gordon, 2nd Viscount Aboyne, Earl of Huntly, and defeated an attempt by the Royalists to seize Stonehaven. However, when Montrose changed sides to the Royalists and marched north, Marischal remained in Dunnottar, even when given command of the area by Parliament, and even when Montrose burned Stonehaven.Marischal then joined with the Engager faction, who had made a deal with the king, and led a troop of horse to the Battle of Preston (1648) in support of the royalists.
  • Following the execution of Charles I in 1649, the Engagers gave their allegiance to his son and heir. Charles II was proclaimed king, arriving in Scotland in June 1650. He visited Dunnottar in July 1650, but his presence in Scotland prompted Oliver Cromwell to lead a force into Scotland, defeating the Scots at Dunbar in September 1650.
  • Religious and political conflicts continued to be played out at Dunnottar through the 17th and early 18th centuries. In 1685, during the rebellion of the Earl of Argyll against the new king James VII, 167 Covenanters were seized and held in a cellar at Dunnottar. The prisoners included 122 men and 45 women associated with the Whigs, an anti-Royalist group within the Covenanter movement, and had refused to take an oath of allegiance to the new king.] The Whigs were imprisoned from May 24 until late July. A group of 25 escaped, although two of these were killed in a fall from the cliffs, and another 15 were recaptured.
  • Both the Jacobites (supporters of the exiled Stuarts) and the Hanoverians (supporters of George I and his descendants) used Dunnottar Castle. In 1689 during Viscount Dundee's campaign in support of the deposed James VII, the castle was garrisoned for William III and Mary II with Lord Marischal appointed captain. Seventeen suspected Jacobites from Aberdeen were seized and held in the fortress for around three weeks, including George Liddell, professor of mathematics at Marischal College. 
  • In the Jacobite Rising of 1715 George Keith, 10th Earl Marischal, took an active role with the rebels, leading cavalry at the Battle of Sheriffmuir. After the subsequent abandonment of the rising Lord Marischal fled to the Continent, eventually becoming French ambassador for Frederick the Great of Prussia. Meanwhile, in 1716, his titles and estates including Dunnottar were declared forfeit to the crown.
  • The seized estates of the Earl Marischal were purchased in 1720 for £41,172, by the York Buildings Company who dismantled much of the castle.In 1761 the Earl briefly returned to Scotland and bought back Dunnottar only to sell it five years later to Alexander Keith (1736–1819),[38] an Edinburgh lawyer who served as Knight Marischal of Scotland.[17] Dunnottar was held by Alexander Keith then his son, Sir Alexander Keith (1768–1832) before being inherited in 1852 by Sir Patrick Keith-Murray of Ochtertyre, who in turn sold it in July 1873 to Major Alexander Innes of Cowie and Raemoir for about £80,000.
  • It was purchased by Weetman Pearson, 1st Viscount Cowdray, in 1925, after which his wife embarked on a programme of repairs.Since that time the castle has remained in the family, and has been open to the public, attracting 52,500 visitors in 2009.
  • Portions of the 1990 film Hamlet, starring Mel Gibson and Glenn Close, were shot there.
  • With hanging thread on the back ready for immediate home wall display. 
  • Incredible conversation piece for your guests. 
  • We only select & sell paintings based upon subject quality & significance. 
  • We provide our clients with friendly professional customer service. 
  • Condition report. 
  • Offered in fine used condition. 
  • Front painting surface in good overall order. Having some foxing staining scuffs to the surface in places. Frame which has general wear, scuffs, paint losses, stains some minor chips also some splitting along the bottom section commensurate with usage & age. 
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Dimensions in centimetres of the frame approximate

High (70.5cm)
Wide (92cm)
Depth thickness of frame (3.5cm)

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