Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By – Cheshire Antiques Consultant
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy
Cheshire Antiques Consultant

Oil Painting RMS Empress of Japan Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary By John Rowan Dominy

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  • 1 Fine Art Oil Painting Maritime "RMS Empress of Japan" Passenger Liner Ship Sailing Fraser Estuary Vancouver Canada By John Rowan Dominy.
  • Oil on canvas board.
  • Circa mid 20th century.
  • Set in a traditional frame.
  • Signed by the known British artist John Rowan Dominy whow as born in 1926.
  • The artist has a selection of his paintings are in the Portsmouth naval museum.
  • Subject maritime seaview of the RMS Empress Of Japan passenger liner ship sailing along Fraser estuary by Vancouver In Canada.
  • Having such beautiful perspective in the background you can view the Canadian snow top mountains and forests behind the shoreline.
  • Provenance bought from a fine art sale in southern England.
  • RMS Empress of Japan was an ocean liner built in 1929–1930 by Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company at Govan on the Clyde in Scotland for Canadian Pacific Steamships (CP). This ship was the second of two CP vessels to be named Empress of Japan[1] – regularly traversed the trans-Pacific route between the west coast of Canada and the Far East until 1942.
  • In 1942, she was renamed RMS Empress of Scotland – the second of two CP vessels to be named Empress of Scotland.[2] In 1957, the Hamburg Atlantic Line purchased the ship and re-named her TS Hanseatic.
    The new liner intended for the transpacific service was envisioned at approximately 25,000 gross register tons, 203.05 m (666 ft 2 in) in length and capable of carrying 1173 passengers in four classes.
  • Construction of the vessel was awarded to Fairfield Shipbuilding & Engineering Company at Govan near Glasgow in Scotland. She was launched on 17 December 1929 and named Empress of Japan.
  • Originally Canadian Pacific had planned on constructing a sister ship for her for the Pacific service, but due to the Great Depression the second ship was left unrealized. Instead, the company decided to concentrate their resources on Empress of Britain, a larger version of Empress of Japan under construction for their trans-Atlantic service. Empress of Britain was approximately 16,000 GRT larger than Empress of Japan.
  • Empress of Japan carried out her sea trial successfully in May 1930, achieving a top speed of 23 knots; and on 8 June 1930, she was delivered to Vancouver for service on the trans-Pacific route. In this period, she was the fastest ocean liner on the Pacific.
  • She would continue sailing the Vancouver–Yokohama–Kobe–Shanghai–Hong Kong route for the rest of the decade. Amongst her celebrity passengers were a number of American baseball all-stars, including Babe Ruth, who sailed aboard Empress of Japan in October 1934 en route to Japan.
  • Empress of Japan carried out her sea trial successfully in May 1930, achieving a top speed of 23 knots; and on 8 June 1930, she was delivered to Vancouver for service on the trans-Pacific route. In this period, she was the fastest ocean liner on the Pacific.
  • She would continue sailing the Vancouver–Yokohama–Kobe–Shanghai–Hong Kong route for the rest of the decade. Amongst her celebrity passengers were a number of American baseball all-stars, including Babe Ruth, who sailed aboard Empress of Japan in October 1934 en route to Japan.he outbreak of war in Europe caused Empress of Japan to be re-fitted for wartime service.
  • Following the Japanese attacks on the Empire outposts in the Far East in December 1941, the name of the ship needed to be changed. In 1942, she was renamed Empress of Scotland.With hanging thread on the back ready for immediate home display.
  • Reference sources artuk, Portsmouthnavalmuseum & wikipedia.
  • Incredible conversation piece for your guests.
  • We only select & sell paintings based upon quality & significance.
  • We understand your purchase is for your home or as an investment.
  • We provide our clients with friendly professional customer service.
  • Condition report.
  • Offered in fine used condition.
  • The front painting surface does have some foxing staining towards the top of the painting in the sky area in places commensurate with usage & age. The frame has some wear, scuffs, scratches commensurate with usage & age.
  • International buyers worldwide shipping is available please ask for a quote.
  • Viewings are welcome by appointment only for customer support please send a message thankyou.
  • Browse our other exciting collections available in our shop gallery happy shopping.

 


Dimensions in centimetres of painting surface image area approximate

High (39cm)
Wide (49cm)


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